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Just because FBI director James Comey believes his agency has a right to see your phone's encrypted data doesn't mean he'll get his way. Members of Congress from both major parties, including House Representatives Darrell Issa and Zoe Lofgren as well as Senator Ron Wyden, are saying that there's "zero chance" they'll pass a bill requiring that device encryption includes backdoor access for federal investigators. They argue that law enforcement has blown whatever chance it had at public support -- accountability problems at multiple agencies (especially the NSA) have led many to distrust the government's data requests. As it stands, the FBI is battling some fierce legal headwinds. The House recently passed a bill banning the NSA from using backdoor searches, and it's doubtful that these politicians will heed Comey's calls for more access.

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We weren't terribly fond of Samsung and Barnes & Noble's first tablet mashup, but it seems at least a few people were. If you happen to fall into that category, congratulations -- that odd couple has something else that might be up your alley. The new Galaxy Tab 4 Nook 10.1 is technically the largest Nook ever released (only because Samsung already did the heavy lifting with design and production) and once again it's basically a stock tablet with BN apps like Nook Library and Nook Shop sprinkled into the mix for good measure. Everything else -- from the 1.2GHz Qualcomm chipset running the show, to the 10.1-inch display running at 1280x800, to the full eye-searing load of Samsung software tweaks -- is a well-known quantity so you'll know exactly what you're getting into. On the plus side at least, the Nook-ified version of the Tab 4 10.1 costs the same $199 as the bog-standard version (after instant rebate, at least) and comes with $200 of sweet, sweet content gratis. Interest piqued? You can pick up yours starting today, but you should only do so after thinking about it really, really hard.

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iMac with Retina display review: A best-in-class screen makes it worth the high price

When Apple held one of its big keynotes last week, it was easy to think of it as "iPad day." Sure enough, the company announced some upgraded tablets, but it was a desktop, of all things, that stole the show. Though the new 27-inch iMac with Retina display has the same overall design as Apple's previous all-in-ones, it ushers in a 14.7-million-pixel 5K display with screen resolution of 5,120 x 2,880. That's seven times as many pixels as 1080p, and 67 percent more than you'll find even on a 4K panel. I'm not exaggerating when I say there's nothing like it. As it is, you'd be hard-pressed to find a 4K all-in-one, and meanwhile, here's this machine from Apple, with enough pixels to view a 4K video at full resolution, and still have room left onscreen for other stuff, like the Final Cut Pro dashboard. Needless to say, it's in a league -- and price class -- of its own. Starting at $2,499, it's more expensive than almost any other all-in-one on the market, even the supposedly high-end ones. As it turns out, though, if it's this kind of screen quality you're after, this might well be your only choice.

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Yes, there are a lot of wearable devices that can monitor your activities and health, but an earpiece called SensoTRACK claims to be able to do it all. By "all," we mean it can measure respiration and heart rates, detect oxygen saturation in your body and provide an almost real-time blood pressure reading. It can also count your steps and the calories you burn, measure your speed and activity level during exercise, track your weight, BMI, blood sugar levels and your emotional state. Its creators even claim that it's more accurate than wrist gadgets, because it's worn in your ear, and hence located near the temporal artery. As you'd expect, SensoTRACK connects to an Android or an iOS app, as well as to a desktop portal (via Bluetooth LE or microUSB), which list all your stats, workout history, goals and routes taken. But, in case you're stuck somewhere without access to phones or computers, you can always save up to a week's worth of data on its onboard storage.

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You've probably heard of the Nielsen Ratings, which are the figures relating to the number of people who watch a particular TV series. It's these statistics that Hollywood uses to decide if your favorite show gets a second season or if it'll only live on in fan fiction. Unfortunately, with more and more entertainment being delivered online, a TV ratings company isn't much use to anyone. That's why Nielsen has teamed up with Adobe to begin rating pretty much everything on the internet. By splicing Nielsen's audience know-how with Adobe's online analytics and video tools, the pair promise to be able to work out which gets more attention: news websites, social media, blogs or that video of the cat running head-first into a glass door. The system will go live at some point in 2015 with Sony, ESPN and Viacom already saying that they'll be signing up, hopefully so that we can finally find out, once and for all, if anything is more enjoyable than that video of the cat running head-first into the glass door.

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The Xbox One's €29.99/£24.99 TV Tuner is now available, but it's far from just a glorified channel changer for Microsoft's console. As we mentioned, it came out only in Europe because many of us across the pond get our TV fix from over-the-air (OTA) digital TV, while most Americans have cable. But it's opened up a lot of handy new TV watching features on the Xbox and on mobile devices with SmartGlass, too. You can now watch DVB-T, DVB-T2 and DVB-C digital TV, pause, rewind or fast forward live TV, change channels using SmartGlass and even watch TV directly on a mobile device. For a console that wants to be your entertainment hub, that's a load of pertinent features -- to see how it works, read on.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When we first saw the Avegant Glyph earlier this year, it was still in its alpha stage. The home theater headset that literally looks like a pair of chunky headphones for your eyes did impress us with its stunning visuals, but the overall thing was still very rough around the edges as far as fit and components go. Now, after a successful Kickstarter campaign and a move to California, Avegant is confident that it's honed in on the last few adjustments it needs to get the finished product out the door, and I was able to get a sneak peek at just what those updates are.

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Bowers & Wilkins wants you to keep up appearances with the T7, its first portable Bluetooth speaker. The bespoke UK audio company has certainly nailed the design, with an elegant honeycomb "micro matrix" cabinet designed to reduce vibration and distortion. It's also got twin bass radiators, high-quality Bluetooth aptX and audiophile electronics and drive units. Bowers & Wilkins has promised intuitive light cues and minimal buttons, plus a whopping 18-hour battery life. The only thing that might give you pause is the $350 price tag, a premium over the beloved, but still-not-exactly-cheap $300 Big Jambox, for example. Still, considering its objet d'art looks, if the sound quality measures up to all of Bowers & Wilkins fancy adjectives, it might be worth the extra 50 bucks.

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Little girl figure skating at sports arena

A team of engineers at Brigham Young University are developing smart skates specifically for athletes who spin, jump and do crazy pirouettes on ice. Why? Well, figure skaters land with a force equal to six times their body weight when they jump (according to the team's paper published earlier), so they're prone to injuries like broken bones and impacted joints. These special skates can measure how hard the athletes land, enabling them to correct angles or to time their spins better to prevent accidents. Unfortunately, you can't just put a small analyzer on skates like you would on a baseball bat or a tennis racket to measure the force of a landing.

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If you ever thought to yourself, "Self, I need a crowdfunded toothbrush that tracks my oral activities," you're in luck. The folks at Goodwell estimate that we'll each go through some 300 toothbrushes over the course of our lifetime. As such, it wants to do its part to wage a war against the "planned obsolescence" of traditional fang-cleaning apparatus. For just $69, you get a hollow aluminum handle with a compostable, replaceable, charcoal brush head -- even with a $79 subscription for replacement parts that's still cheaper than Oral B's SmartSeries. If you're feeling even more spendy though, you can get what's known as the premium kit, which comes with screw-on flosser and tongue-scraper accessories, costing $89.

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