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Wearable police camera

The police aren't often fond of publishing body camera and dashcam footage online, but not necessarily for nefarious reasons -- the volume of privacy-focused video editing they require can prove overwhelming. In Seattle, for example, a flood of public disclosure requests from an anonymous programmer (known by his "policevideorequests" handle) risked scuttling a body cam trial run before it got off the ground. However, that one-time antagonist is now coming to the city's rescue. The man has agreed to help Seattle's police department publish video by showing them how to quickly redact clips and get them online. As the unnamed person explains, it should mostly involve ready-made tools; the police will strip audio from clips using free software and lean on YouTube's automatic face blurring to protect identities.

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Samsung's bright idea with the Galaxy S4 Active was simple: Take a Galaxy S4, and shove it in a body that didn't shy away from drops, dust and water. When our Sarah Silbert put the device through its paces, she found that the device was better-looking than your average rugged handset. There was, however, a "but" lurching around the corner, since the device had a weaker battery life, camera and display compared to its older sibling. Still, plenty of you would have taken advantage of AT&T's deal to grab one of these, so why not head over to the forum and tell us what life has been like with this device?

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FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler

It's no secret that the FCC has at least a few links to the communications companies it's policing. Chairman Tom Wheeler is a former lobbyist, and commissioners have taken industry jobs mere months after leaving office. However, Vice News has obtained records showing that the two sides are frequently in direct contact -- and there's a concern that this may be affecting the net neutrality debate. For example, Cisco CEO John Chambers called Wheeler to endorse proposed net neutrality rules earlier this year. To him, they encourage new business models without imposing "onerous regulation." Chief Comcast lobbyist Kathy Zachem, meanwhile, gave the FCC's top lawyer advance notice of Republican objections to the proposal. Wheeler has also spoken with other prominent figures on the topic, including former FCC chair (and now National Cable & Telecommunications Association head) Michael Powell.

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Laptops at Chaos Computer Club 2013

Highly sophisticated malware isn't limited to relatively high-profile sabotage code like Stuxnet -- sometimes, it's designed to fly well under the radar. Symantec has discovered Regin, a very complex trojan that has been spying on everyone from governments to individuals since at least 2008. The malware is highly modular, letting its users customize their attacks depending on whether they need to remote control a system, get screenshots or watch network traffic. More importantly, it's uncannily good at covering its tracks. Regin is encrypted in multiple stages, making it hard to know what's happening unless you capture every stage; it even has tools to fight forensics, and it can use alternative encryption in a pinch. Researchers at Symantec suspect that the trojan is a government-created surveillance tool, since it likely took "months, if not years" to create.

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Too Many Cooks

By now, there's a good chance that you've seen or heard about Adult Swim's Too Many Cooks -- an epic, warped internet video that sends up the overly tidy world of '80s and '90s sitcoms. But just why did this video manage to click with so many people? If you ask PBS, it's because the 11-minute clip speaks directly to the heart of online culture. The internet is fond of absurdist humor that highlights the apparently meaningless, repetitive nature of life, PBS argues; Too Many Cooks plays on that love of the ludicrous by dismantling a formulaic, "perfect" TV universe where everything has meaning.

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4K, gaming, and a tale of two monitors

Unlike most gadgets and peripherals, our computer monitors tend to stay with us for a good chunk of time. My current 23-incher has been with me since the days of my Palm Centro. So when it comes to shopping for a new display, it certainly pays to know what you want out of it. Are you heavily into gaming and need a monitor with crazy-high refresh rates? Would you rather have as big a screen as possible for all those windows you have open every day? I recently spent a month with two of AOC's latest models: a 24-incher with NVIDIA G-Sync support for serious gaming, and a 4K 28-inch display that puts a premium on pixels. Could either one convince me to let go of my trusty Viewsonic?

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Chores are the bane of domesticity. Dull and repetitive tasks have already been farmed out to robots in industrial workplaces, so why not our homes, too? On a small scale, they've already arrived, just not quite in the way film and TV promised. For this week's Rewind, we take a look at some of the highlights in the history of robotic servants.

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Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week's most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us -- it's the Week in Green.

The Los Angeles Auto Show kicked off last week, and Inhabitat was on the scene to bring you a first look at the hottest new green cars. Among the vehicles unveiled at this year's show were Volkswagen's SportWagen HyMotion hydrogen fuel cell concept car and Audi's new A7 Sportback H-Tron Quattro, which is also powered by hydrogen. Inhabitat editor Mike Chino also had the opportunity to test-drive the futuristic Toyota Mirai, which can be powered by clean hydrogen gas made from raw sewage. In other green transportation news, the company Camp-Inn has created a crazy custom Toyota Prius that transforms the hybrid sedan into a small camper. With a fiber-reinforced plastic hump added to the back of the car, there's enough space for a bed.

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The castAR team has just shipped its first pair of augmented reality glasses, a year after it raised $1 million on Kickstarter. This headset, developed by a group headed by ex-Valve engineers Jeri Ellsworth and Rick Johnson, features active shutter glasses, a camera for input and a projector that displays 3D images onto a surface. Its developers call the device "the most versatile AR and VR system," but its strength lies in augmented reality (digital display superimposed against the real word) -- you can't even use its VR functions unless you also get the optional clip-on. When we interviewed the developers and tried out the latest prototype, we noticed a number of improvements from previous versions, including brighter and crisper images and a lighter design.

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3D-printed quantum dot LEDs

You can use 3D printing to make a handful of electronics, such as antennas and batteries, but LEDs and semiconductors have been elusive; you usually need some other manufacturing technique to make them work, which limits what they can do and where they'll fit. A team of Princeton researchers recently solved this problem, however. They've found a way to make quantum dot LEDs (and thus semiconductors) using only a 3D printer. The scientists choose printable electrodes, polymers and semiconductors, which are dissolved in solvents to keep them from damaging underlying layers during the printing process; after that, the team uses design software to print the materials in interweaving patterns. In this case, the result is a tiny LED that you could print on to (or into) many objects, including those with curved surfaces.

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