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AOL doesn't just want short clips of newsy content on its online video platform, AOL On. That's why our parent company has signed a non-exclusive deal with Miramax to screen some of its movies on the service. The first flicks from the agreement will go up on April 30th, with "tens" of films from the catalog being made available on a rotating basis each month. Neither company was ready to disclose what particular titles we could expect, so while most of us are hoping to catch Clerks, Trainspotting and Pulp Fiction for free, don't be surprised if they wind up being the lesser lights contained on this list.

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"Our major aims were usability, friendliness and a more humanistic design. We wanted something with a pleasing feel ... and better grip. If we used metal, [we felt] the designs felt heavy and cold," explains Senior Product Designer Dong Hun Kim, pointing to why Samsung still plays in polycarb. "But with plastic, the texture is warmer. We believe users will find [the device] both warmer and friendlier. This material was also the best at visually expressing volume, better at symbolizing our design concepts." The design concept for Samsung's Galaxy S5? Modern and flash -- and boy, that blue GS5 is certainly flashy. In the middle of a design library deep inside Samsung's "Digital City" in Suwon, Jeeyeun Wang, Samsung's principal user experience designer continues, putting it to me this way: the smartphone is no longer a cold slab of technology; "it's a fashion product now."

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In the seven years since Google launched Maps, it's collected a ton of imaging and location data, which we've only been able to see in its most recent form. That's about to change, however, after the company announced it's opening all of that information up, allowing you to go back and see how much each of its locations have adapted during that period. Starting today, Google says it will begin rolling out the new feature across its desktop Maps service, adding a new clock icon to Street View images. Once clicked, you can move a slider and select the different thumbnails of a location in a particular space in time. You'll see skyscrapers go up, houses come down, and maybe even witness the rebuilding efforts of a community affected by a natural disaster. There's no word on whether it'll make its way beyond the desktop, so for now you'll likely only be able to procrastinate from the comfort of your home computer or office.

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HBO's always been stingy about who gets to stream its cherished TV assets but on May 21st, some of the network's vintage material will get a wider release. The company has signed a deal with Amazon to bring its classic shows, including The Sopranos, The Wire and Deadwood to Prime Instant Video members for free. If you're waiting for newer fare -- by which we mean Game of Thrones -- you'll be disappointed, but seasons of HBO's other new shows, like True Blood and Veep will arrive roughly three years after their first broadcast. As part of the deal, HBO Go will launch as an app on Amazon's Fire TV set-top box, which is due to land at some point towards the end of the year. In the meantime, however, you can prepare yourself for a May binge-a-thon by buying in plenty of snacks and bottled water.

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solar panels

Google has just announced another major investment in renewable energy -- not to power its own vast data centers this time, but rather to bring cheaper electricity to the homes of ordinary Americans. Alongside solar cell manufacturer SunPower, the internet giant is starting a $250 million fund (including $100 million of its own cash) to buy up solar panels and then lease them back to American households. It promises the lease cost will be "typically lower" than a home's regular electricity bills, but it has yet to provide specifics on the costs involved or exactly when the project is scheduled to get going. With solar panels steadily getting cheaper, it seems entirely probable that the partnership would recoup its investment over time, while still providing consumers with a financial incentive to go green.

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If you used a Samsung app recently it was possibly a mis-click, according to a Strategy Analytics survey of 250-plus Galaxy S3 and S4 users. While Samsung recently trumpeted 100 million users for ChatOn, for instance, the report said US users spent a mere six seconds per month on the app, compared to, say, 151 minutes on Instagram. The rest of the suite fared little better, with users spending no more than seven minutes per month on all its apps combined. By contrast, users stayed on Facebook for 11 hours and Google's three most popular apps for 150 minutes on average. If accurate, that would be a stinging rebuke, given that Samsung's apps are pre-installed on most of its devices and can't be removed easily -- unless, ironically, you're in its home country.

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What would you say if we told you that it's possible to copy, translate, edit and even erase the text inside any image you find on the internet? Well, you can, and it's a lot easier than you might think. All it requires is a new browser extension, called Project Naptha, made by developer Kevin Kwok. It uses a number of optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms, including libraries developed by Microsoft and Google, which quickly build a model of text regions, words and letters from nearly any image.

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What does the internet love more than cats? App-connected devices that let you feed and entertain the furry monsters when you're out and about. Kittyo is a coffee maker-shaped device designed to do just that, packing a webcam, laser and a treat dispenser. That way, you can check your moggies are safe, keep 'em entertained and drop pellets of kibble, even if you're at the office or on holiday. The product launched on Kickstarter, naturally, where it's already smashed its $30,000 target four times over. However, there's still time to make a pledge and get the Kittyo for $120, versus the $180 you might expect to pay if you waited until the product goes on sale in November.

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Google's mobile-streaming tech has a lot going for it, but listening to music stored in Mountain View's cloud is still limited to a handful of home devices. AirPlay-compatible gadgets, however, are a probably a bit more common than the Nexus Q, Chromecast and Sonos systems are, and developer doubleTwist's latest project acts as a bridge between the two ecosystems. The outfit recently released "AirPlay for Android," which is exactly what it sounds like: the tweak open's the search giant's media-streaming to AirPlay devices. The rub is that your device running Google's mobile OS has to be rooted for the hack to work. First, grab and install the aforementioned APK from the dev's blog, launch Google Play Music (GPM) and hit the Cast button. From there, you need to grant root access to the app, force-stop it and then relaunch. Viola! AirPlay devices on your wireless network should populate the list of compatible targets.

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Akamai Technologies' State of the Internet report for Q4 2013 has just arrived, and one stat stands out like a bad rash: DDoS (denial of service) attacks were up 75 percent over last quarter, and 23 percent from the year before. Most of the targets were enterprises, and Akamai said that the likelihood of a repeat hack is one in three -- a 35 percent bump over last year. Such numbers have no doubt fueled demand for services like Google's Project Shield, which shelter businesses behind massive cloud servers that can easily absorb an onslaught. As for the countries of origin? The dubious winner of that prize (by far) was China with 43 percent of all attacks, followed by the US and Canada. The latter nation saw a not-very-polite 2500 percent bump in DDoS attacks over last year -- hopefully not a trend.

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