Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

Telenav wants its latest Scout update for iPhone to stand out from other nav apps by giving what it claims 80 percent of us want while driving: gas, coffee, or food. You can now select a spot serving one of those sans typing and be sure it's decent thanks to a user feedback feature that even accounts for the time of day. Then, Scout will only search places on the road ahead, not behind, to efficiently re-route you -- a feature surprisingly lacking in most GPS apps. Other new tweaks include a guide to the closest and cheapest parking, real-time ETA info relayed to your loved ones and the ability to report traffic conditions, even when not navigating. All of this is free, though it only works in the US and certain features, like offline and voice-guided turn-by-turn navigation, require a $24.99 in-app buy.

0 Comments

You know how Google's been doing such a great job associating addresses with their locations on a map? Apparently, it's all thanks to the company's new magical algorithm that can parse (with 90 percent accuracy) even fuzzy numbers in pictures taken by Street View vehicles. In fact, the technology's so good that it managed to read even those headache-inducing swirly reCAPTCHA images 99 percent of the time during the company's tests. While that proves that the system works really well, it also implies that the distorted Rorschach-like puzzles are not a fool-proof indicator of whether a user is human.

Yes, robots can beat reCAPTCHA after all, but Google swears that it doesn't matter. The company says these findings have nudged it to build additional safeguards, so that it now looks at a number of clues (and not just the text you type in) to determine if you're human or not. Google didn't expound on what those clues are, but next time you get another set of reCAPTCHA puzzles despite doing it right the first time around, you know what's up.

0 Comments

MG is celebrating its 90th year in the car-making business, so to mark the occasion, it's decided to take the wrappings off its first ever fully electric vehicle. Created at parent company SAIC's European Design and Technical Centre (SMTC), the MG Dynamo concept won't be found on Britain's streets just yet (the model you see above is actually classed as a "static preview") because it solely exists to help the once-struggling automaker gauge Europe's demand for a small, electric EV. That said, MG says the Dynamo is capable of generating 70hp of power and can be charged to 80 percent battery capacity in just 30 minutes (a full six hour charge offers a range of around 50 miles). With Mayor Boris Johnson campaigning to get 100,000 EVs on London's streets, MG may one day take its place alongside Renault, Nissan and Volkswagen with its own little city car.

0 Comments

Canadian police just made what could possibly be the first Heartbleed-related arrest. The suspect? A 19-year-old London, Ontario teenager named Stephen Arthuro Solis-Reyes who's being accused of hacking the Canada Revenue Agency website and stealing almost 1,000 Social Insurance Numbers. Canadian mounties believe Solis-Reyes pilfered info from the agency by exploiting the infamous Heartbleed bug, so they seized his computer as evidence during a raid of his home. If you haven't read our explainer yet, Heartbleed's an OpenSSL bug that gives hackers the opening they need to steal sensitive data like passwords. Unfortunately, the tax agency didn't patch up the vulnerability quick enough and only shut down the site to do so after the digital heist.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Eyefi Mobi SD card

There are plenty of cameras that send their photos to your phone, but you frequently have to transfer those pictures yourself -- and it's another hassle to get the pics to other devices. Eyefi thinks it can solve these headaches by launching its own online service, Eyefi Cloud. If you're using one of the company's WiFi-equipped Mobi cards in your camera alongside new Android and iOS apps, any photos go both to your mobile device and Cloud right after you've hit the shutter button. You only need a browser to manage your shots, so you're not stuck if you want to see your photos on a new PC.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Samsung seems to be on a roll with bagging media partnerships for its Galaxy line of phones and tablets. First music streaming service Deezer, and now it's getting a custom-built Kindle book store in a deal with Amazon. Announced this morning, the service also gives Galaxy owners referred to the service (starting with the GS5, but more to follow) 12 free books a year. Users will get four "prominent" titles a month to choose from, which have been "chosen specifically" for Galaxy owners (whatever that means). Samsung's already laden with bespoke services, such as its Milk internet radio platform, its own custom app store, and there's even an existing Samsung Books app. Of course, let's not forget the existing Kindle app for Android. However, if you want to snag yourself those free libros, Kindle for Samsung launches in the next two weeks.

0 Comments

A&E Networks is regularly finding ways to make its programming more widely available, particularly by having on-demand options through TV providers and its own apps. To help boost these efforts, the company's now bringing live streaming into the fold, at least with a couple of properties. As of today, viewers can now watch a real-time feed of A&E and History, via each channel's website and their applications on iOS -- no word on when, or if, the feature will head to Android. Naturally, you'll need a cable subscription to enjoy this, as is often the case for most services that use the internet to broadcast entertainment content.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Spotify's new design on the desktop

Spotify has always streamed at least some of its music over peer-to-peer listener networks, helping it deliver music quickly while saving some cash on bandwidth and servers. However, the service is now ready to leave that tradition behind. It tells TorrentFreak that it's phasing out peer-to-peer connections, with plans for everyone to use dedicated servers in the months ahead. As the firm explains, there's simply no need for peer links at this point -- Spotify's servers can deliver "best-in-class" performance all by themselves.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

What do you get when you combine a few respirator bags, some silicone air valves and a motion detector? A contraption that produces a synthetic version of our most sensual form of communication, the whisper. By fudging the aforementioned items together with a few other crude bits and bobs, designer Minsu Kim has built The Illusion of Life, a machine that he says mimics the breath temperature, humidity, smell and vocal qualities of a whisper. If you're asking yourself "why?" you aren't alone. Kim says that these artificial murmurs work to facilitate "strong bonds of communication and connection between the user and a machine." In effect, using intimate human interaction to bring you closer to a gadget.

Modern tech has already surpassed what the human eye is capable of perceiving, but he says that Life serves to explore which of the other five senses technology should stimulate next. Laugh now, but once the likes of Benedict Cumberbatch or Scarlett Johansson start whispering your to-do list, you'll likely thank Kim.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Shazam for iPhone

It's easy to track down iPhone apps that name catchy tunes, but it now looks like Apple wants to spare you from having to search in the first place. Bloomberg sources claim that a future version of iOS will incorporate Shazam's song recognition in the same way that the existing mobile platform integrates Facebook and Twitter. While built-in music detection wouldn't be a new idea (just ask Windows Phone users), you could ask Siri to tell you what's playing rather than hit a button. There aren't any clues as to when the feature would reach iOS. However, Apple's Worldwide Developer Conference begins in early June -- if the rumor is accurate, there's a good chance we'll get the full scoop in a matter of weeks.

0 Comments